NextShift Robotics Signs Reseller Agreement with Hy-Tek Material Handling, Inc.

NextShift Robotics Signs Reseller Agreement with Hy-Tek Material Handling, Inc.

LOWELL, MA — December 19, 2018 — NextShift Robotics, a provider of autonomous mobile robot solutions for automated order fulfillment and warehouse materials management, today announced a reseller agreement with Hy-Tek Material Handling, Inc. of Columbus, Ohio.

Today’s ecommerce fulfillment operations are challenged by labor scarcity along with the need for quicker response time and dramatically higher throughput. To keep pace with relentlessly rising customer expectations, autonomous mobile robots have emerged as a compelling answer to combat this difficult order fulfillment scalability need. As a leader in the design and implementation of customized integrated systems, Hy-Tek Material Handling, Inc. has entered into an agreement to incorporate, when applicable, NextShift Robotics.

Tom Mann, President of Hy-Tek’s Integrated Systems Division, said, “Hy-Tek prides itself on bringing the most advanced and innovative solutions to create productivity and efficiency for its customers. We looked at all the best robotic fulfillment offerings and found that NextShift’s unique design advantage is its ability to pick up and put down a tote. That key capability creates a truly independent robotic workflow that can deliver greater throughput than any other solution of its kind. That is why we have partnered with NextShift.”

“Hy-Tek’s deep understanding of the material handling business and the trusted collaboration they enjoy with clients complement our technology perfectly,” said Mary Ellen Sparrow, NextShift Co-Founder and CEO. “This synergistic partnership will drive adoption of a practical and innovative robotic approach that produces amazing value for customers.”

About NextShift Robotics

NextShift Robotics designs and manufactures collaborative, autonomous, mobile robotic systems that increase productivity in manufacturing and distribution centers. Founded to revolutionize material handling for e-retailers, 3PLs, OEMs, manufacturers, and brick and mortar businesses, NextShift autonomous robots work with, but independently from, warehouse staff to optimize the fulfillment process by increasing labor efficiency, order velocity, and warehouse capacity utilization. Visit www.nextshiftrobotics.com.

About Hy-Tek Material Handling

Hy-Tek Material Handling, Inc. is the premier single-source provider of material handling solutions for a wide range of industries. Since 1963, Hy-Tek and its best-in-class industry partners have been providing customers large and small with turnkey solutions. Headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, Hy-Tek serves customers in the United States, Canada, and Mexico from offices in Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. Visit www.hy-tek.com.

Press Contact:
Chris Russell, Sales and Marketing, NextShift Robotics, Inc. 781-825-3876 or Crussell@NextShiftRobotics.com

NextShift Robotics Displays Ramp Climbing Ability

NextShift Robotics Displays Ramp Climbing Ability

Lowell Massachusetts, 12-10-2018, NextShift Robotics, a provider of fundamentally different robotic workflows for material handling in distribution and manufacturing recently demonstrated the ability of its robots to climb 8+ degree ramps.

See a video of the ramp demonstration here -> https://youtu.be/kjw0R68du4c

“It sounds simple”, says Mary Ellen Sparrow, CEO of NextShift, “but the ability to climb steep ramps and handle rough surfaces is a powerful differentiator for us.”

“Most robots,” she continued, “are designed to only operate on clean and level floor surfaces.  In a real distribution or manufacturing environment this is seldom the case.”

A real-world robustness has been designed into NextShift robots with the understanding that the surfaces aren’t always flat and pristine.  This is an invaluable differentiator when dealing with the realities of logistics.

Why is that important?  Because in many cases material handling workflows must move between buildings or onto mezzanines with open grating.  Unless you have a robot that is designed to handle these surfaces and inclines you won’t be able to support your workflow.

Often people don’t discover this limitation in their robots until they run into it in their facility.  Robots without this ability will simply stop, essentially getting stuck in the facility until someone comes to rescue them.  Having to rescue stuck robots runs counter to the value proposition of ‘robotic automation’.

Next Shift robots don’t get stuck.  NextShift robots are built for the real world of logistics and manufacturing.

Whitepaper: Execs Reveal What Moves Them from Interest to Action on AMRs for Fulfillment

Whitepaper: Execs Reveal What Moves Them from Interest to Action on AMRs for Fulfillment

5 New Reasons why AMRs are ready for Prime Time

We asked a cross-section of industry influencers, practitioners and executives the question: “What are the barriers to adopting Autonomous Robotic workflows in fulfillment?” and got some fascinating answers. That input helped us create a white paper titled The Amazon Effect & Robotics Adoption in Fulfillment that reveals five perceived barriers that may be keeping you from revolutionizing your fulfillment operations using autonomous mobile robots, along with some insider recommendations on how to mitigate those barriers.

First off, let’s quickly review the value that can be generated by AMRs—robots that work independently of both people and orders:

  • 50% increase in worker efficiency compared to current throughput of cart picking or pick-to-belt scenarios
  • Pick rate increase of more than 3x when 100% independent robots work with pickers
  • Fewer “human touches” results in dramatic increase in picking accuracy and order quality
  • Payback in under 12 months

Given these compelling points, it’s no wonder there’s a wave of interest in robotic piece picking. But if you haven’t yet moved from interest to action, it might be due to one of these five common misperceptions:

  1. Robot technology is risky and unproven at scale

It often takes influential “first movers” to demonstrate the real results that get the rest of the industry going. Of course, distribution centers have been adopting automation and robotics since the invention of the assembly line. Our research shows that a good first step step is to initiate small scale AMR deployments that demonstrate efficacy, then scale up. Happily, AMRs are extremely cost-effective and easy to add incrementally. They can be rolled out with very little impact on existing infrastructure. Companies may start with a small product category or a selected area of the warehouse then scale by phasing in more robots.

  1. Robot-based solutions are expensive

What we found was implementing an AMR solution does not trigger expensive infrastructure reconfigurations, physical plant remodeling, worker retraining, and system integration fees. Instead, labor efficiency drives ROIs that can be measured in months, not years. The cost of AMR is a fraction of the cost of alternative approaches such as, conveyors, and fixed automation. Robots and pickers can work side by side, allowing existing (brown-field) DCs to be quickly and easily retrofitted with no disruption in daily output. The DC can keep fulfilling the core business as AMRs are added, something not possible with conveyor or other fixed automation conversions.

  1. The software hasn’t kept up with robotic hardware

Our conversations revealed that initially, vendors provided robot hardware that required extensive custom software programming to integrate with existing warehouse and order management systems. But today’s next-generation AMR technology optimizes the entire workflow by managing orders, workers and robots independently for the highest level of benefit. Because of advances in the maturity of the solutions, today’s robust, mature, comprehensive software-hardware systems integrate more easily with base systems, are easier to administer, and manage.

  1. Integration to current systems is difficult and risky

Our interviews revealed that some warehouse and fulfillment teams fear that their existing systems will have to be modified to meet the robots’ requirements. This is an understandable fear, but today’s robotic solutions come coupled with a mature software system. The WMS (or equivalent) sends orders and the robotic system sends back completions.  To the WMS, the AMR software is just another picker to send orders to, and that picker sends a notification back when the product has been picked.

  1. Cultural change is a big organizational risk (workers will reject them)

In our experience, AMR technology is a major job satisfaction improver that dramatically reduces stress and physical strain on workers, while raising accuracy. This leads directly to better worker retention.

For some, there is a perception that employees and management are predisposed not to embrace robotics as a worker-friendly productivity booster. The managers we spoke to praise robotic workflows as a way to retain core workers while relying less on temporary and flex help. Reducing touches and the human mistake rates that are inherent to manual systems results in higher productivity, process quality, and fewer unhappy customers. Win-win.

In an era dominated by growing ecommerce demands and shortages of labor, workflows must be transformed. The more execs we talk to, the more we find who consider autonomous mobile robots to be the most significant replenishment power-up available to warehouse teams today. When robots work completely untethered from workers and are independent from the orders being picked, each element can be scheduled and optimized specifically. This is only possible with robots that can pick up and place containers without any worker intervention.

We’ve found that the most common barriers to AMR adoption are largely based on misperceptions that are easily swept aside. Early adopters are finding out how little real risk is involved in adopting game-changing AMR automation. For more about overcoming these five “barriers,” read our whitepaper.

5 Piece-Picking Benefits Only Independent Mobile Robots Can Deliver

5 Piece-Picking Benefits Only Independent Mobile Robots Can Deliver

Contributed by Fred Hajjar, Managing Partner at Weston Supply Chain Consulting

(Dramatic cost savings, yes, but there’s more…)

When supply chain professionals ask the question: “ What are the practical benefits of independent mobile robotics?” they expect to hear the answer “They deliver substantial cost savings.” But the full answer is that adding next-generation robotics to your warehouse also impacts your revenue, competitiveness and growth. In addition to lowering labor expenses and mitigating resource constraints, robots speed up and improve order fulfillment functions in uniquely scalable ways that drive a transformation in cost structure and productivity for accelerating business growth.

So the full answer to the question “What are the benefits of robotics?” encompasses these five facets:

1.      Higher Labor Productivity

The most-cited “go to” benefit by users of distribution center robotics. Labor expense reduction drives ROIs that can be measured in months, not years. Multishift and peak execution approach “first shift” productivity due to the simplification of the picker’s task and general streamlining of the human processes. Independent mobile robotic solutions let pickers pick while the robots do everything else. Early cases show up to 100% increase in labor productivity.

2.      Higher Throughput Capacity

One of the most understated benefits of robotic enabled picking and replenishment.  Without the need for expensive smart conveyors and major infrastructure investments, independent mobile robotic solutions allow manual DCs to be enabled with few infrastructure modifications. The robots and pickers can work side by side, which allows existing DCs to be quickly and easily retrofitted with no disruption in daily output.  Automation can be added in small steps and phased to match growth in demand. This produces higher order fulfillment rates per hour from the existing facility. The DC can keep fulfilling the core business as the adoption is added. This is simply not possible with smart conveyor or other fixed automation conversions.

3.      Capital Cost Reduction:

Traditional methods of expanding picking capacity entail major infrastructure cost. Costs may be incurred for additional DC locations, building expansion, adding conveyor systems, AS/RS systems, new picking mezzanines, and much more.  Independent mobile robotics solutions require significantly less capital cost. In many cases picking to discrete orders eliminates expensive secondary sortation and removes constraints imposed by manual picking and packing activities. Leveraging the robotic workflow produces a rapid-payback, low-capital solution.

4.      Peak and Off-Shift Productivity:

What if you could deploy fewer, better trained workers instead of an army of temps? Non-first-shift activities chronically suffer from lower productivity, staffing difficulties, and high turnover. Independent mobile robotic workflows can ramp up for the peak season with less additional labor, and bring even new workers up to speed more quickly.  The streamlined process delivers a two-fold benefit: lower training time/skills requirements plus increased execution excellence. Both the day shift and the off-shift are made more efficient because as the day shift becomes more productive, off-shift requirements go down.  Higher picker productivity enables shorter shifts. The work is done with fewer resources, more efficiently in less total time.

5.      Revenue Enhancement:

Customers buy more when they get what they want when they want it, at the cost they want to pay. Adopting a next generation robotic workflow impacts revenue and growth directly by supporting higher levels of demand with speedier click-to-door fulfillment and lower costs.  Over the past 5 years delivery expectations have collapsed from 6 days to 1 day (or less). Failing to deliver on those customer expectations consistently results in lost market share and brand damage.

The agile robotic workflow provides more flexibility for market capture/demand shaping activities like flash sales and promotions. By reducing touches, shrinkage and the human mistake rates that are inherent to manual systems, higher peak demand can be met with high process quality, resulting in fewer unhappy customers and returns. Next generation mobile robotic workflows enable you to execute faster while holding margin and quality.

Conclusion:

The benefits of adopting a next generation robotic workflow for picking and replenishment are real and quantifiable.  With these benefits the use of robotics in the warehouse is inevitable.  The onus is on supply chain professionals to get in front of this shift before they are left behind.

Where do you want to be in 5 years?

Can you Solve your Piece Picking, Labor, Capacity, and Delivery Challenges with Robots?

Can you Solve your Piece Picking, Labor, Capacity, and Delivery Challenges with Robots?

NextShift Robotics presents a webinar for executives and directors of companies with piece picking distribution operations and the 3PLs and System Integrators who support them. Watch it on demand below!

Have questions? Send a note to Chris Russell at crussell@nextshiftrobotics.com

How (Decoupled) Robotic Solutions Free Up Warehouse Workers

How (Decoupled) Robotic Solutions Free Up Warehouse Workers

The fulfillment world is on the cusp of a new robotic revolution. Adding an autonomous mobile robot (AMR) fleet to your distribution center is one of the most powerful productivity steps you can take this year. Whether your goal is to cut fulfillment costs or increase fulfillment capacity, the key to maximum improvement lies in decoupled AMRs.

Decoupled AMRs are a technology and a methodology for fulfillment operations in which orders, human piece pickers, and autonomous transport robots are treated as entirely independent from each other. The robot vehicle isn’t paired to an order. The picker is not paired with (does not accompany) the robot. Instead, in decoupled fulfillment automation, fleet-controlled autonomous robots optimize materials handling by picking up order-totes, transporting them to the next picking location or to the shipping area, and setting them down at the destination without any oversight by workers. This means that the picker is not leading, following or waiting for the robot.

This robot-human collaboration transforms fulfillment operations because the robots are more than automated carts. In decoupled AMR, an order may be held in usually one tote, be piece-picked by several workers, and shuttled from one location to another by a series of robots assigned on an ad hoc basis by the software. Each AMR performs one leg of the order fulfillment transport path, which of course ultimately ends at the shipping area.

Takeaway: All autonomous mobile robotic systems are not created equal. Decoupling is the key.

Decoupling the robot from the worker allows each to go to locations independently when ready. This solves the old “traveling salesman” problem that has long constrained the picking process: while the picker and the robot have to go to the same shelf location they do not have to be there at the exact same time. Removing that constraint means neither robot nor human ever waits for the other. Workers can dedicate themselves to picking only, and remain within a comfortably defined product aisle zone. Robots, on the other hand, spend their time independently placing totes at the ready within picking aisles, receiving optimized “transporting assignments” from the software and moving totes without any human assistance.

This solves the overall picking efficiency problem at the highest level, guaranteeing maximum fulfillment throughput and minimum time-to-ship per order while optimizing labor costs by right-sizing the picking staff.

The result? You can handle your existing workload with fewer pickers in fewer hours. Your existing warehouse space can handle more orders, raising your capacity limit. Your customer service improves dramatically due to fewer picking errors and shorter order response times.

Takeaway: Right-sized staffing, higher capacity, faster time-to-ship, fewer bad picks, much happier customers.

You may be accustomed to seeing robotic solutions for warehouse operations that pair up workers with robotic carts, but that has changed. The latest decoupled AMR technology creates a simultaneous dual workflow using parallel teams of workers and robots. To review, neither worker nor robot is assigned to process an entire order exclusively. Pickers place items from the product shelves into pre-positioned totes, then confirm that the tote is ready to move on. Next, the software dispatches a robot along the optimal path to the shelf, where it grabs the tote and transports it either to the shipping area directly or to another location to receive more items in the order. Any robot can move any tote.

Separating piece picking into discrete actions that can be performed by multiple robots and pickers creates an efficient, fluid process. It vastly reduces worker stress by eliminating lifting and carrying totes through the warehouse aisles. Worker job satisfaction increases, which leads to higher retention rates. And making pickers more productive can combat the labor shortage challenges so chronic in many geographies.

Comparing the use of decoupled AMRs to a manual picking scenario have found a staff of workers can process the same number of order lines faster, with significantly lower physical stress. Now, that’s a revolution!